Cownose ray, Blue spotted ribbontail ray, Eagle ray, Bat ray, Southern Stingray...

(Source: aeroplani)

roachpatrol:

blazepress:

The level.

i’m very angry and very impressed

roachpatrol:

blazepress:

The level.

i’m very angry and very impressed

urgentcum:

I DID NOT KNOW SIRI COULD DO THIS REBLOG TO SAVE SOMEONES LIFE

urgentcum:

I DID NOT KNOW SIRI COULD DO THIS REBLOG TO SAVE SOMEONES LIFE

monocromas:

deathrock:

becausebirds:

The blackest bird there ever was. It’s black on the outside from head to toe, and black on the inside with its meat and organs.

It’s called the Ayam Cemani from Indonesia, and they’re $2,500 a pop. Their bones are black, too. The only part of them that’s not black is their blood 

That’s metal.

a-night-in-wonderland:

cloud iridescence - caused as light diffracts through tiny ice crystals or water droplets of uniform size, usually in lenticular clouds.

mashable:

So many items arranged so beautifully.

(Source: Mashable)

markdoesstuff:

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

I’ve already added my name and YouTube Channel to this! This shit is a super big deal to me because Net Neutrality ending would probably lead to some terrible ramifications for what I do. 

markdoesstuff:

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

I’ve already added my name and YouTube Channel to this! This shit is a super big deal to me because Net Neutrality ending would probably lead to some terrible ramifications for what I do. 

spring-of-mathematics:

isomorphismes:

Monotone and antitone functions
(not over ℝ just the domain you see = 0<x<1⊂ℝ)
These are examples of invertible functions.

Theorem on the inverse function of continuous strictly monotonic functions:
Suppose the function f:(a,b)→ℝ with -∞≤a<b≤+∞ is strictly increasing (resp., decreasing) and continuous. Letlim f(x)=α≥-∞ and     lim f(x)=β≤+∞ ,  if f is strictly increasing, resp.,x→a+                      x→b−lim f(x) = β≤+∞ and  limf(x ) = α≥-∞,  if f is strictly decreasing,x→a+                      x→b−Then f maps the interval (a,b) invertibly onto the interval (α,β). The inverse function f -1:(α,β)→(a,b) is also strictly increasing (resp., decreasing) and continuous, and we have:
lim(f -1)(y)=a    and   lim(f -1)(y)=b,    if f is strictly increasing, resp.,y→α+                     y→β− lim(f -1)(y)=b   and    lim(f -1 )(y)=a,    if f is strictly decreasing.y→α+                      y→β−
Analogous statements hold for semi-open or closed intervals [a,b].[Source]

Also, If (m,n) ⊂ (a,b), the function f:(a,b)→ℝ, that is also true.

spring-of-mathematics:

isomorphismes:

Monotone and antitone functions

(not over ℝ just the domain you see = 0<x<1⊂ℝ)

These are examples of invertible functions.

Theorem on the inverse function of continuous strictly monotonic functions:

Suppose the function f:(a,b)→ℝ with -∞≤a<b≤+∞ is strictly increasing (resp., decreasing) and continuous. Let
lim f(x)=α≥-∞ and     lim f(x)=β≤+∞ ,  if f is strictly increasing, resp.,
x→a+                      x→b−
lim f(x) = β≤+∞ and  limf(x ) = α≥-∞,  if f is strictly decreasing,
x→a+                      x→b−
Then f maps the interval (a,b) invertibly onto the interval (α,β). The inverse function f -1:(α,β)→(a,b) is also strictly increasing (resp., decreasing) and continuous, and we have:

lim(f -1)(y)=a    and   lim(f -1)(y)=b,    if f is strictly increasing, resp.,
y→α+                     y→β−
lim(f -1)(y)=b   and    lim(f -1 )(y)=a,    if f is strictly decreasing.
y→α+                      y→β−

Analogous statements hold for semi-open or closed intervals [a,b].[Source]

image

Also, If (m,n) ⊂ (a,b), the function f:(a,b)→ℝ, that is also true.

(Source: talizmatik)

thelovelyseas:

Hannah Fraser swims dressed as a mermaid with humpback whales off Vava’u Island, Tonga, to raise awareness of marine life and oppose whale hunting. Photos by Ted Grambeau